Redecorating Middle-earth in Early Lovecraft

Always Halloween and Never Thanksgiving

2,179 notes

todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969
From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

Filed under NASA history of space exploration astronauts Apollo 11

765 notes

todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”
Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)
From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.
via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”

Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)

From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.

via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

Filed under bastille day thomas jefferson storming of the bastille

173 notes

tea-at-221b:

Robert Fawcett “Sherlock Holmes”

From 1952 to 1953 Adrian Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan’s yongest son, wrote a total of one dozen “Sherlock Holmes” stories with John Dickson Carr.

Published in both Good Housekeeping and Colliers.

All twelve stories were illustrated by Robert Fawcett.

The stories were published in the book: The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes. Publication has ceased, though you can find the book through several third-party sellers.

Filed under Arthur Conan Doyle Adrian Doyle Sherlock Holmes John Dickson Carr Robert Fawcett Good Housekeeping Collier's Weekly The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes

117 notes

athousandwinds:

 Lady Reading in an Interior, oil on canvas by Marguerite Gérard, French, 1795-1837. Private Collection.
 After the death of her mother in 1775, Gérard went to Paris to live with her sister and became the protégé of her brother-in-law, Jean-Honoré Fragonard. They lived for nearly 30 years in the Louvre.
 By 1785, she was the first French woman to be recognized as a gifted genre painter. Gérard specialized in oil, portraits, miniatures and etchings. Her interiors with rich detail proved to be extremely popular.

athousandwinds:

 Lady Reading in an Interior, oil on canvas by Marguerite Gérard, French, 1795-1837. Private Collection.

 After the death of her mother in 1775, Gérard went to Paris to live with her sister and became the protégé of her brother-in-law, Jean-Honoré Fragonard. They lived for nearly 30 years in the Louvre.

 By 1785, she was the first French woman to be recognized as a gifted genre painter. Gérard specialized in oil, portraits, miniatures and etchings. Her interiors with rich detail proved to be extremely popular.

(via teacoffeebooks)

Filed under Marguerite Gérard Lady Reading in an Interior woman reading reading books